Rail operators urge public to work from home during strikes while cab firms threaten fare hikes - iNews

Summary

Train operators and motoring organisations have warned that commuting to work or school next week is likely to be nightmarish amid the country’s biggest rail strikes in more than three decades.

With 13 train companies across the country along with Network Rail workers going on strike, rail networks and roads are forecast to be chaotic.

Train operators and motoring organisations have warned that commuting to work or school next week is likely to be nightmarish amid the country’s biggest rail strikes in more than three decades.

With 13 train companies across the country along with Network Rail workers going on strike, rail networks and roads are forecast to be chaotic.

Taxi companies are expecting a bumper week as commuters try to find alternative routes to work with only one in five train services likely to run.

Train operators, which urged the public to stay away from the rail network and to work from home where possible, have published fresh timetables for strike days.

RMT workers are to go on strike on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday next week, and travel on the days following each walkout are also likely to be heavily disrupted.

Train operators across England, Scotland and Wales will scale back their operations to just a handful of services on strike days, with dramatically reduced timetables also scheduled for the “shoulder” days in between the strike action as the network struggles to recover.

Commuters who try to make their way into work by car face slow journeys on extremely busy roads, motoring organisations said.

“The roads are likely to be much, much busier as people have little choice but to take their cars to get to work and carry on their daily lives,” said Simon Williams of the RAC.

Mr Williams advised those planning to drive to leave as early as possible to avoid the gridlock.

“It’s all about trying to be on the road when others aren’t, which can mean getting up very early,” he said.

AA spokesman Luke Bosdet added that the school run could also cause headaches for parents as millions more people take to the roads during rush hour.

“Schoolkids that normally take the train won’t be able to. Parents will therefore have to drop off and pick up at both ends of the day and, particularly in the morning, this will collide with the rush-hour,” Mr Bosdet said.

Among the rail operators to publish its strike timetable is Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR), the UK’s largest rail franchise. It is pulling 75 per cent of its services on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday despite its workers not being part of the national strike action. About 40 per cent of its usual services will run on Wednesday and Friday.

The firm, which manages England’s Southern, Thameslink, Great Northern and Gatwick Express routes, encouraged customers to stay at home or find alternative methods of transport from Tuesday to Saturday, stressing they should only try to travel by rail for journeys that are “absolutely necessary”.

GTR employees are not participating in the strike action but its services depend on National Rail signallers and engineers, and its trains run through many stations managed by firms whose staff are walking out.

A GTR spokeswoman said: “The pandemic has given people more options to work flexibly, which will help next week.”

ScotRail staff are not striking either, but services across Scotland will also be hugely disrupted. The operator said it can only offer about 11 per cent of its normal timetable on strike days. It previously estimated just five per cent of its services would run.

Transport for Wales (TfW), whose staff have not been balloted and are not striking, said customers who normally travel for work should work remotely all week if they can.

On a normal day, TfW offers about 1,000 train services, but on the strike days, it will only be able to run around 80, or eight per cent, of that. A spokesman said its advice was not to travel by train on strike days or on non-strike days next week.

South Eastern, whose emergency timetable also revealed sweeping cuts to routes, is slashing 80 per cent of services. Most of the routes it will run are concentrated in London.

A spokesman said customers should “absolutely” work from home next week instead of trying to get in to their office by train. He echoed other operators’ pleas for the public to ”only travel [by train] if necessary”.

Some taxi firms and ride-hailing platforms are likely to maximise fares as demand spikes.

Addison Lee customers travelling within a 75-mile radius of central London will be subject to a £5 surcharge.

“With demand for our car services likely to be greater than usual, we are working to ensure we have sufficient cars on the day for your important journeys, and so we will be applying a £5 additional charge, going directly to our driver partners, to all journeys within a 75-mile radius of Central London,” it said.

Uber, which routinely hikes prices by as much as 150 per cent when demand swells, said it was expecting “significant increases in demand” next week. A spokesman did not rule out the possibility of surge pricing.

Rail operators urge public to work from home during strikes while cab firms threaten fare hikes - iNews
Photo Credit: iNews

Recent WFH News Articles

Work from home in India: 73% firms plan hybrid working model post Covid-19 pandemic | Mint - Mint

With several companies experiencing challenges since the outbreak of Covid-19 pandemic, a new survey has shared that 73% of India firms are evaluating if hybrid working arrangement …

Read more here
Work from home in India: 73% firms plan hybrid working model post Covid-19 pandemic | Mint - Mint

This Is How Leaders Can Make the Best of Remote Working - Entrepreneur

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Remote work is no longer a temporary solution or a means to an end. It's now our reality. Learning how to build effi …

Read more here
This Is How Leaders Can Make the Best of Remote Working - Entrepreneur

North Wales secondary school asks children to work from home due to Covid spike - North Wales Live

A North Wales secondary school has asked some children to work from home due to a rise in Covid cases. Ysgol Aberconwy is telling students to work from home for certain days this w …

Read more here
North Wales secondary school asks children to work from home due to Covid spike - North Wales Live

Hybrid Work Is Doomed - The Atlantic

I noticed the shoes first. That I was wearing them. Real shoes, the leather kind, with laces. After a year and a half, I was finally returning to the office, and that meant giving …

Read more here
Hybrid Work Is Doomed - The Atlantic

Dutch to make working from home a legal right – and the rest of Europe could follow - The Telegraph

The Netherlands is on the cusp of making working from home a legal right in a radical move that experts say could be followed across Europe. The Dutch parliament has approved a la …

Read more here
Dutch to make working from home a legal right – and the rest of Europe could follow - The Telegraph