Health director reports downward trend in COVID-19 numbers - Carolinacoastonline

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8 in the County Health Department conference room.
Department of Health of Human Services, as of last week, there were 169 confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported in the county.
However, that number is likely higher because many people now use home rapid tests and don’t report results to the health department.
Department of Health and Human Services, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday that the county is now considered in the high range for community spread.
As for updates on vaccinations, Oliver said the CDC has approved another COVID-19 vaccine, Novavax, and the County Health Department has received 100 doses.

Health director reports downward trend in COVID-19 numbers - Carolinacoastonline

MOREHEAD CITY — There has been a slight decline in COVID-19 cases in the county, according to County Health Director Nina Oliver. CDC drops quarantine, distancing recommendations for COVID-19 NEW YORK (AP) — As students prepare to return to classrooms, the nation’s top public health … “We are currently trending down,” Oliver said during the County Consolidated Human Services Board meeting, held Aug. 8 in the County Health Department conference room. According to the N.C. Department of Health of Human Services, as of last week, there were 169 confirmed cases of COVID-19 reported in the county. However, that number is likely higher because many people now use home rapid tests and don’t report results to the health department. That number compares to 173 cases the first week of July and 182 cases the last week of June. There have been 16,230 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the county since the start of the pandemic. As of Friday, there have been 139 COVID-19 related deaths reported in the county since the start of the pandemic. Carteret Health Care on Aug. 11 reported no hospitalizations related to COVID-19. While Carteret County was deemed to be in the medium range for community spread of COVID-19 earlier this week by the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday that the county is now considered in the high range for community spread. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention publishes a weekly report categorizing every county in the nation as low, medium or high. The level is based on hospital beds in use, hospital admissions and new COVID-19 cases. The agency updates its report by 8 p.m. each Thursday. The NCDHHS also issues a map and report each Wednesday. However, it is based on the previous week’s numbers. As for updates on vaccinations, Oliver said the CDC has approved another COVID-19 vaccine, Novavax, and the County Health Department has received 100 doses. “This vaccine does not contain mRNA (messenger RNA), which has been the concern for people not wanting to get vaccinated,” she said. “This is not interchangeable with the mRNA vaccines (such as Moderna and Pfizer).” She added that the percentage of county residents who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 has leveled off. As of Aug. 8, 70% of the county’s population has received at least one dose of vaccine, with 65% receiving two doses or one dose of Johnson & Johnson. About 37% of the county’s population has received additional doses or boosters. Oliver also gave a brief update on monkeypox, and no cases have been reported in Carteret County. As of Aug. 8, there were 111 cases identified in North Carolina. “As of today, we have not tested anyone or referred anyone for vaccine, but we have the ability to test and provide vaccine to those that fit criteria,” Oliver said. She said monkeypox can be spread person-to-person through infected body fluids (including saliva and lesion fluid), items that have been in contact with infected fluids or lesion crusts and respiratory droplets. “The incubation period is usually 7-14 days but can range from 5-21 days,” she said. “People with monkeypox are infectious from the start of symptoms, which is before the rash forms, until the lesions heal and new skin forms underneath scabs and scabs have fallen off.” Oliver said symptoms that a person can experience before the rash forms are generally flu-like symptoms, as well as swollen lymph nodes. In an additional report, Oliver said the county’s Miles of Smiles mobile dental clinic is being remodeled. “Funding from a grant will support new countertops, ceiling tiles, equipment and cabinets,” she said. During the school year, the clinic travels to county schools to provide dental services to low-income children. She reported that beginning in summer 2023, the clinic will begin providing services to daycares, focusing on newborns to 5-year-olds with no insurance. “Currently there is no place for this age group to go in the county,” she said. Oliver also reported that on Sept. 20-22, the health department will partner with County Emergency Medical Services and the Sheriff’s Department to provide opioid and Narcan outreach presentations. The locations will be at Fort Benjamin in Newport, the Crystal Coast Civic Center in Morehead City and the Bridge Downeast on Harkers Island. The focus will be to educate the public on opioids, overdoses, what to do if someone has an overdose and how to use Narcan. “The health department has ordered 240 doses of Narcan from the state,” she said. “This is provided to those in need, law enforcement, the homeless shelter, churches and other civic groups.” In other action, the board: Agreed to start meeting on a quarterly basis instead of each month in an effort to recruit more members to its board. The 25-member board currently has seven vacant seats. Heard a health department accreditation report. Heard a Department of Social Services review of its 2018-22 strategic plan. Under the consent agenda, the board: Approved accepting $300,808 in federal Communicable Disease Pandemic Recovery funds. Approved accepting $9,296 in federal Women, Infants and Children funds. Approved accepting $4,000 in John H. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program funds from the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services. These funds will be used to provide school clothing to foster care youth between ages 14 to 17. Approved the 2022 Consolidated Human Services Board policy review. Contact Cheryl Burke at 252-726-7081, ext. 255; email Cheryl@thenewstimes.com; or follow on Twitter @cherylccnt.
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